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How things work when the family comes along

Moderator: Tempo Gain

How things work when the family comes along

Postby SamVines » 03 May 2016, 20:20

How things work when the family comes along

A while back I taught in Taiwan and I’m interested in returning. Were I to return, my relevant qualifications will include being a certified teacher, having worked (still working) as an IELTS examiner and over a decade’s teaching experience.

What I’m wondering about is how the game changes if you bring along family, in this case a spouse and a child. Will they be covered by the national insurance scheme through my employment? Are employers adverse to hiring teachers who bring along their families? The best bet will probably be working for an international school that offers free (or reduced) tuition for the children of employed teachers.
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Re: How things work when the family comes along

Postby Charlie Jack » 29 May 2016, 01:10

SamVines wrote:How things work when the family comes along

A while back I taught in Taiwan and I’m interested in returning. Were I to return, my relevant qualifications will include being a certified teacher, having worked (still working) as an IELTS examiner and over a decade’s teaching experience.

What I’m wondering about is how the game changes if you bring along family, in this case a spouse and a child. Will they be covered by the national insurance scheme through my employment? Are employers adverse to hiring teachers who bring along their families? The best bet will probably be working for an international school that offers free (or reduced) tuition for the children of employed teachers.


I'm sorry for the late reply, but I don't have a family, so I'm not familiar with employer attitudes toward foreign workers who bring their families.

However, I'll try to answer the question about National Health Insurance for dependents.

A poster asked about this matter in 2005:

I have now received my health insurance card (at last). I want to know if my wife is covered by it also, or if she has to have her own job and her own card. She has her ARC through me already.

Thanks.


viewtopic.php?p=308298#p308298

Another poster answered:

Check the FAQs at the NHI site: http://www.nhi.gov.tw/00english/e_index.htm.

Ifr she is unemployed, you will pay an additional premium for her.


viewtopic.php?p=308301#p308301

The National Health Insurance Administration link in the post quoted above is now dead.

This appears to be current information from the National Health Insurance Administration website:

Those who are unemployed but able to enroll as a dependent through a relative (i.e., parents, spouses, or children) could participate in the National Health Insurance program through a relative's insurance registration organization after six months continuous residence in Taiwan.
--National Health Insurance Administration, "Foreign Nationals from Hong Kong, Macau, China, or Other Countries who Reside in Taiwan with an Alien Resident Certificate (ARC)"

http://www.nhi.gov.tw/English/webdata/w ... ta_id=3148

I hope this helps, and I hope that someone else comes along and answers your other question.

--Charlie
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