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Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby Hokwongwei » 18 Aug 2015, 01:20

The weirdest temple I've heard of has to be the one where CKS is enshrined within. That's somewhere in Hsinchu, right hansioux?

Then there's the Catholic church in Yanshui, Tainan where Jesus, Mary, and all the apostles are portrayed as classical Chinese people.
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby Zla'od » 18 Aug 2015, 05:59

The Mother Teresa church in Kalimpong (West Bengal) is built in a Himalayan architectural style, with Tibetan-style paintings of Jesus, Mary etc around the outside. (Didn't get to see the inside.) That is to say, Mary looks like a Tibetan woman, the shepherds look like Khampas or Amdowas, and Jesus wears a robe kind of like a Buddhist monk, except blue.
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby hansioux » 18 Aug 2015, 09:30

Hokwongwei wrote:The weirdest temple I've heard of has to be the one where CKS is enshrined within. That's somewhere in Hsinchu, right hansioux?


Yes, sadly I see it too often. It's across the street from NTHU.

Hokwongwei wrote:Then there's the Catholic church in Yanshui, Tainan where Jesus, Mary, and all the apostles are portrayed as classical Chinese people.


awesome, that and the Mary with Seediq tatoo on her face in Taoyuan are things I must see.
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby hansioux » 25 Aug 2015, 17:25

there's a temple (Fuangong 福安宮) in Dongshi, Jiayi that worships a god called Yiaigong (義愛公).

Image

The god is dressed in a Japanese police uniform. It's to commemorate Morikawa Seijiro 森川清治郎 who came to Taiwan in 1897.

Image

At the time southern Taiwan was a tough place to live in. The lack of irrigation, long periods of drought and soil salinization made farming difficult. Most of the inhabitants were illiterate, and had poor hygiene. Morikawa was assigned to Dongshi, and immediately worked to improve locals' lives.

He setup a school at Fuangong, and taught the locals Japanese himself. He would award good students with paper and pen. He also worked to improve local hygienic situation by instructing villagers to dig sewage drains. He worked to improve soil salinization and offered the sick assistance.

The Japanese colonial government placed a heavy tax burden on the locals who had very little to begin with. Morikawa petitioned to reduce tax and was accused of placating to the locals. Morikawa was first punished, and then forced to collect all the backed taxed within his term.

On April 7, 1903, Morikawa went to Qingangong (慶安宮) and left a note that said "Tyranny disrupts civic life (苛政擾民)", then proceeded to commit suicide with a rifle. He was 42.

The grief stricken villagers buried Morikawa and decided to worship him at the temple where he taught the locals Japanese. He was referred to as Yiaigong (義愛公 The god of justice and civic love), but now more commonly known as Riben Wangye (日本王爺, the Japanese royal lord).
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby Chris » 25 Aug 2015, 17:59

There's a temple in the hills above Xizhi with a mummy covered in gold foil.
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby Mucha Man » 25 Aug 2015, 19:37

Great story, hansioux.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby hansioux » 21 Apr 2016, 10:34

http://www.crntt.tw/doc/1042/0/1/2/1042 ... =104201252

There's a temple in coastal Taoyuan called Tongshanci (同善祠), dedicated to the worship of a deity named Tongshanma (同善媽)

Image

The deity is named Mazu style, but there is no statue for her. The Dutch representative in Taiwan visited the temple on the 19th because Tongshanma was actually a Dutch nun who came to Taiwan 160 years ago and devoted the rest of her life to Taiwan. She did do much for the suffering locals, that they dedicated a temple to her after she passed away.

The temple is actually built on top of Tongshanma's tomb, and when they renovated the temple in 2014, they also dug up her cremated bones and reburied her. Unfortunately the locals don't remember Tongshanma's name. They also failed to actually turn Christian, so... well, I am sure Mother Tongshan still appreciates the gesture.

Maybe they can identify her name from some Dutch historical Church records?
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby finley » 21 Apr 2016, 11:08

Mucha Man wrote:Great story, hansioux.

You're full of fascinating stuff hansioux. Ever thought of writing a book? I would love to know how people like Morikawa did what they did in the face of what must have been deep mistrust.
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Re: Weirdest temple in Taiwan?

Postby hansioux » 21 Apr 2016, 14:37

finley wrote:
Mucha Man wrote:Great story, hansioux.

You're full of fascinating stuff hansioux. Ever thought of writing a book? I would love to know how people like Morikawa did what they did in the face of what must have been deep mistrust.


I just randomly come across these stories. I think it would be really interesting if MuchaMan can get to interview the people really in the know. In the Tongshanma case, perhaps find out who she actually was.
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