Click here to go to our new forums at http://tw.forumosa.com
If you are a Forumosan Regular, when you log in for the FIRST TIME, you must RESET your password by using the Password Recovery system.

Usernames on the new forums must not contain any SPACES and must end with LETTER or a NUMBER; if yours does, you will be prompted to change your Username
Contact us at admin(at)forumosa(dot)com or @forumosa on Twitter or on our Facebook Page if you have any questions or problems logging back in

30 Hour Famine... works?

Forum rules
While the moderators are happy to help point people in the right direction for legal assistance and to attempt to keep these forums civil and tidy, please bear in mind that an Internet forum is not the place for providing or receiving legal advice or for the creation of any attorney-client privileges or obligations. Also keep in mind that Forumosa and the moderators cannot conduct comprehensive reviews of all laws or legal concepts referenced or discussed within these forums – laws and regulations are updated and amended, interpretations do change, and sometimes the legal landscape can change very fast. Forumosa provides these legal forums for general informational purposes only. By using these legal forums, you agree that the information does not constitute legal or other professional advice and no attorney-client or other relationship is created between you and any other posters on these forums. DO NOT CONSIDER THE FORUMS TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR OBTAINING LEGAL ADVICE FROM A QUALIFIED LICENSED ATTORNEY.

30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby golf » 01 Dec 2013, 19:36

25th "30 Hour Famine".. Excuse me, my opinion: Even 60 more times of modified "90 Hour Famine" won't change a thing. The point is to elevate the sense of self-esteem of black people. What do you folks think?

第25屆飢餓30... 不好意思,我的看法:改成飢餓60再辦90年也不會有變化。重點是要提升黑人們的自尊意識。大家覺得呢?
https://www.google.com.tw/#q=%E8%96%91% ... A%E5%A3%AB
Get to the 1st Facebook page result (薑博士), click "Like" and:
Stay tuned with the world's most innovative drying technology that will change the territories of the world's food industry.
golf
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 300
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 20 May 2010, 08:12
Location: Taipei, Hualien, Pingtung



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby navillus » 01 Dec 2013, 19:58

I've actually had this on my mind lately after being on World Vision's page. I suspect the idea is to give Western folks an idea of what it feels like to be truly hungry, if just for a short period of time. I really think the only way I could do it is if I ate and went to bed early one night and then stayed up late the next night waiting for the 30th hour.
"collective madness is called sanity"
Paulo Coelho, Veronika Decides to Die
User avatar
navillus
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 22:13
Location: Kaohsiung



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby finley » 01 Dec 2013, 21:42

These things are a bit daft because they're supposed to be about changing the world in such a way that (say) fewer Congolese go hungry. Well, good luck with that. There are lots of reasons why poor nutrition is common in DRCongo, but most of those reasons are baked into the fabric of DRCongo.

OTOH I think it doesn't hurt to know what hunger feels like. I'd prefer not to be reminded, thanks all the same, but I do like the rationale behind ritual fasts like Ramadan. Acute hunger (a few hours of fasting), incidentally, does not feel anything like chronic hunger (months or years of regular but inadequate food), so it's a bit pointless doing it just for a day.
"Global warming is happening and we KNOW that man is 100 percent responsible!!!"
- Fred Smith
User avatar
finley
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
 
Posts: 7145
Joined: 20 Jan 2011, 23:34



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby navillus » 01 Dec 2013, 22:30

finley wrote:.....so it's a bit pointless doing it just for a day.


I really don't see it as pointless. Compassion begins with empathy. If you don't know what it feels like to be hungry, and the news reports, "Thousands/millions are hungry/starving" it means nothing to most people. If you can relate with the feeling of being hungry, you'd probably be more likely to give to these aid organizations who promote this kind of thing.
"collective madness is called sanity"
Paulo Coelho, Veronika Decides to Die
User avatar
navillus
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 22:13
Location: Kaohsiung



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby finley » 01 Dec 2013, 22:52

navillus wrote:If you can relate with the feeling of being hungry, you'd probably be more likely to give to these aid organizations who promote this kind of thing.

Possibly, yes. But that's going to do nothing to actually address the causes of hunger in those countries. World Vision, in particular, gets my back up for being rather naive and happy-clappy in their approach. Their website is full of buzzwords and vaguely-stated noble goals, but very little in the way of hard results, case studies, or project descriptions. I know their focus is mainly on disaster relief - and that's fine - it's just that I'd prefer to put my money into more productive long-term efforts that try to prevent disasters happening in the first place.
"Global warming is happening and we KNOW that man is 100 percent responsible!!!"
- Fred Smith
User avatar
finley
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
 
Posts: 7145
Joined: 20 Jan 2011, 23:34



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby golf » 07 Dec 2013, 17:27

finley wrote:... I know their focus is mainly on disaster relief - and that's fine - it's just that I'd prefer to put my money into more productive long-term efforts that try to prevent disasters happening in the first place.

:thumbsup:
https://www.google.com.tw/#q=%E8%96%91% ... A%E5%A3%AB
Get to the 1st Facebook page result (薑博士), click "Like" and:
Stay tuned with the world's most innovative drying technology that will change the territories of the world's food industry.
golf
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 300
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 20 May 2010, 08:12
Location: Taipei, Hualien, Pingtung



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby navillus » 07 Dec 2013, 18:02

golf wrote:
finley wrote:... I know their focus is mainly on disaster relief - and that's fine - it's just that I'd prefer to put my money into more productive long-term efforts that try to prevent disasters happening in the first place.

:thumbsup:


Yes, thumbs up from me, too. As said, noble goals. However, all the money in the world can't prevent disasters. Japan's 2011 tsunami and hurricane Sandy in the US are two good examples of countries which probably had the resources to ready themselves, yet still failed. How much would the price tag be to make every home in a country like the Philippines earthquake/typhoon/tsunami-proof? Where would you even begin? It's unfortunate that it takes a disaster to get people to give. I'm not really familiar with World Vision's disaster relief efforts but do contribute to their child sponsorship program. Hopefully a "productive long-term effort".
"collective madness is called sanity"
Paulo Coelho, Veronika Decides to Die
User avatar
navillus
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: 15 Feb 2006, 22:13
Location: Kaohsiung



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby finley » 07 Dec 2013, 23:57

navillus wrote:However, all the money in the world can't prevent disasters.

Never a truer word was said. That's why it frustrates me that many charities and NGOs - who are in a prime position to really make a difference - often don't make good use of the money they do have.

I think the key is to get people helping themselves - getting communities involved in and enthused by new projects - and there are many different ways to do that. Once you get people really interested, and believing that something's going to work, they'll usually fund themselves (if that something is available at the right price). Poor people do actually have money, but they're overly cautious about spending on things other than necessities. The organisations which are most successful at this sort of thing tend to keep a low profile; Helvetas are very, very good at what they do, but most people have probably never heard of them. I was reading an article the other day about a university student - just her, and a gaggle of volunteers - who has managed to promote composting toilets in Haiti. It's an utter disgrace that all those NGOs, awash with cash after the earthquake, didn't do this in the first instance. It's a completely obvious solution given Haiti's demographics, economy, and environmental situation.

Anyway, I instinctively mistrust organisations that have lots of promotional pictures of white people giving stuff to smiling black kids.

Japan's 2011 tsunami and hurricane Sandy in the US are two good examples of countries which probably had the resources to ready themselves, yet still failed.

Well .. yes and no. Japan's misfortune really was a statistical outlier; one of those one-in-a-few-centuries events. The Japanese do at least try to take account of the things nature does, where Americans seem to think nature ought to take account of them. Building dense collections of balsawood homes in a country that gets regularly hit by hurricanes is probably not a smart design decision.

How much would the price tag be to make every home in a country like the Philippines earthquake/typhoon/tsunami-proof?

"Price" acquires complicated meanings when you're talking about homes. If the design life of the building is 100 years, then the initial construction cost is a fairly minor issue. You can build a state-of-the-art everything-proof building for perhaps US$20K. Even poor people can afford this, with a little creative financing. This has been done as a proof-of-concept by (for example) the Dept. of Architecture at the University of Kassel, in co-operation with local charities in South America. But it's awfully hard to get things like this rolled out on a big scale, because the people who control big funding - governments and huge NGOs - often know next-to-nothing about what's available, what works, and what can be done at low cost. They're also far more focused on giving stuff away - which obviously has limits - rather than introducing commercially-viable changes that are self-sustaining.

The Philippines is a classic example of a country where problems are mostly self-inflicted. They're in love with concrete, and they pour it everywhere. They think it's "modern". They have absolutely no clue how to use it. So, for example, you've got Manila, which is essentially a huge flat concrete carpark, that floods every single monsoon. A city like would be just fine in (say) New Mexico, but If you have a monsoon climate, and you seal the ground watertight, it will flood. It's inevitable. Similarly, around Tarlac city, people are building houses and farms on a floodplain ... which, erm, get flooded. All the time. So why attempt to do that? If you know a place is permanently waterlogged, use it for industries that can make use of waterlogging. There are dozens of food plants that would grow well there. Carabao and pigs love wallowing. Make some ponds; farm fish. The economic opportunities are endless, but people ignore them and try to do something completely inappropriate instead.

I'm not really familiar with World Vision's disaster relief efforts but do contribute to their child sponsorship program. Hopefully a "productive long-term effort".

Hard to tell. An interesting article here which pretty much sums up my thoughts on the subject:

http://acrowinghen.com/2011/06/10/thoug ... onsorship/

Basically, I take a rather dim view of educating the natives. In general, this takes the form of herding kids into a concrete box and making them rote-memorize a bunch of irrelevant facts. It has the superficial form of education, but it's missed the basic point - which is to provide a child with useful knowledge and prepare him/her for the reality of adulthood. IMO it would be better to do it by way of apprenticeships: kids in poor countries are invariably used as cheap labour, so if they could be co-opted into organisations which teach them a whole bunch of practical skills (and associated academic knowledge, where appropriate) they'd have a far better chance of making a good life for themselves. For example, farming is big in the boondocks, so why not teach them how to farm properly? Along the way, you'd end up explaining some maths, science, foreign languages, communication skills, management skills, etc ... not to mention a few really important things, like respect for nature and man's place within it.
"Global warming is happening and we KNOW that man is 100 percent responsible!!!"
- Fred Smith
User avatar
finley
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
 
Posts: 7145
Joined: 20 Jan 2011, 23:34



Re: 30 Hour Famine... works?

Postby Zla'od » 23 Mar 2014, 07:18

So...famine is a lot like binge dieting!
“What part of a woman is the yet, anyway? I heard there was a fight here in Tulsa, and a woman was shot in the fracas. The doc said the bullet is in her yet. And how did the bullet get in her yet, when she was shot in the fracas?"
Zla'od
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
 
Posts: 1702
Joined: 05 Aug 2009, 08:36



FRIENDLY REMINDER
   Please remember that Forumosa is not responsible for the content that appears on the other side of links that Forumosans post on our forums. As a discussion website, we encourage open and frank debate. We have learned that the most effective way to address questionable claims or accusations on Forumosa is by engaging in a sincere and constructive conversation. To make this website work, we must all feel safe in expressing our opinions, this also means backing up any claims with hard facts, including links to other websites.
   Please also remember that one should not believe everything one reads on the Internet, particularly from websites whose content cannot be easily verified or substantiated. Use your common sense and do not hesitate to ask for proof.




Return to Human Rights



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 0 guests

cron