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Back to the U.S. grind contemplating on returning to taipei to build a career.

Moderator: John

Re: Back to the U.S. grind contemplating on returning to taipei to build a career.

Postby headhonchoII » 07 Jun 2016, 08:40

Kind of important info to leave out.
I think it will obviously be easier for you then in terms of work as long as you improve your Mandarin skills to fluency, you probably have sown fluency and understanding already. Most folks who move to Taiwan these days seem to be overseas Taiwanese of some sort so it's not uncommon.
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Re: Back to the U.S. grind contemplating on returning to taipei to build a career.

Postby Icon » 07 Jun 2016, 09:37

headhonchoII wrote:Kind of important info to leave out.
I think it will obviously be easier for you then in terms of work as long as you improve your Mandarin skills to fluency, you probably have sown fluency and understanding already. Most folks who move to Taiwan these days seem to be overseas Taiwanese of some sort so it's not uncommon.


Yep. It is the "I do not fit there, they are racist towards me, I must show filial piety and go back to reclaim my position on top of the food chain and reinforce the idea that Taiwan is superior" ingrained mentality. So sad. Example: cue to my conversation with a kind neighbor.:

Icon: Heard you were selling the old place?
Neighbor: Nope. My son has decided to work in Taipei. He is going to live there.
I: Really? What is his field?
N: MBA
I: Gulp. ( :loco: )
N: He graduated in the States and now he says he likes to work in Taipei
I: Really? :eek: Has he worked here before? For how long? Was he working for a relative or something? It is rare to hear someone say he likes to work here
N: No, he has never worked in Taiwan.
I: :noway: Let me talk some sense to him. We'll have him back in the US in no time.

I am summarizing the conversation, but basially the guy has never worked before and is coming her with a lot of what we call in Spanish "pregnant birdies" in his mind. It is going to be a rough landing, and totally unnncessary one. Why leave your network, the opportunities, etc, just because of a mirage? Sigh.
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Re: Back to the U.S. grind contemplating on returning to taipei to build a career.

Postby nonredneck » 09 Jun 2016, 15:00

OP, have you done any research into the salary levels here? They are not that great.
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Re: Back to the U.S. grind contemplating on returning to taipei to build a career.

Postby ironlady » 09 Jun 2016, 20:28

And just how long do you really think it's going to take you to become "fluent" like a native? Were you planning on being able to read and write like a native, too?

You're missing sixteen years of schooling in Chinese. That's a tough thing to make up. Not that you can't work at a lower level of fluency -- just don't think you'll be "indistinguishable" from those who never left Taiwan.
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Re: Back to the U.S. grind contemplating on returning to taipei to build a career.

Postby redline » 13 Jun 2016, 15:04

ironlady wrote:Taiwan is great. I'd move back in a second if I could. But only as an individual, fluent in Chinese, and willing to live out the rest of my life there and find ways to do it -- relying on a lot of savings and not assuming I would get anything from anyone, including the government. Sometimes if you're in your 20s or 30s retirement doesn't seem so close, but it's really easy to rip through five years, ten years, twenty years in Taiwan just like that without realizing that you haven't managed to get anything...solid.

Bingo. And agree with others on "building" a career in Taiwan. As much as I like Taiwan, I'm not sure it's the place to go as a launchpad, especially if the OP's Mandarin skills aren't up to scratch.
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