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Living standards in Taiwan?

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Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby xhellchris » 19 Jul 2016, 06:38

I'll be going over to Taiwan to study in NTNU in 2 years time. I would like to know how is life there surviving alone as a student. Are the food expenses there really as cheap as what people say? Will it be difficult to navigate my way around the streets if my Chinese is only on the average level? How much can a student roughly earn working part time job? Are the people there nice and easy to make friends with?
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby afterspivak » 19 Jul 2016, 07:57

You are asking about plans two years from now? Kudos to you for being far-sighted and organized. But as I am sure you know, beware that things change.

Among your many questions, I can confidently answer one: you will have no problem finding your way around the NTNU neighbourhood in Taipei, with or without awesome Chinese.

Best of luck with your planning,
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby tommy525 » 19 Jul 2016, 08:53

You should be fine. Start making local friends early. So when you arrive you have a contact or two.
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby ranlee » 19 Jul 2016, 10:33

xhellchris wrote:Are the food expenses there really as cheap as what people say?


Food can be ridiculously cheap, yes. However, it can add up. Ask around the locals where to eat. A lot of restaurants in the area have unlimited refills on rice or on soup.

xhellchris wrote:Will it be difficult to navigate my way around the streets if my Chinese is only on the average level?


If you can read maps/Google maps, you will be fine.

xhellchris wrote:How much can a student roughly earn working part time job?


Many PT jobs make the state required $150NT/hour. Not sure if there's a cap on how many hours students are allowed to work though.

xhellchris wrote:Are the people there nice and easy to make friends with?


Many will come off pretty shy, but they'll open up once you get to know them!
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby nonredneck » 19 Jul 2016, 11:02

I think it's 20 hours per week for student with a legal work permit, but that depends on your employer. You employer may not even report the income if you work part time, so you could work more in that situation if you wanted, but I think it might be illegal.

I don't think the food is cheap here. Comparing same quality and quantity of food, I find it cheaper back home, it's just that people here eat less and the safety of the ingredients at the cheaper places is really questionable. Look up food scandals in Taiwan and you'll see what I mean. For comparison, a normal MOS burger meal in Taipei is the size of children's meal at McDonald's in the states. Western food here is expensive. So if you are concerned about budget, you'll have to go local. I also suggest that you get a Costco membership.

For navigation, the MRT is fairly foreigner friendly. I would advise you to download the "Fun Travel in Taipei" app for Android and iPhone. It's very useful for using the buses as it gives the routes overlayed on a google map.
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby Gain » 20 Jul 2016, 00:45

Idk about America but the size of a mos burger meal is the same as a normal size meal in all European McDs. And HK McDs, Japanese McDs... It goes on.
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby RickRooney » 20 Jul 2016, 00:47

nonredneck wrote: For comparison, a normal MOS burger meal in Taipei is the size of children's meal at McDonald's in the states.


I think that says more about Americans than taiwanese.
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby Ibis2k12 » 20 Jul 2016, 11:09

RickRooney wrote:
nonredneck wrote: For comparison, a normal MOS burger meal in Taipei is the size of children's meal at McDonald's in the states.


I think that says more about Americans than taiwanese.


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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby nonredneck » 20 Jul 2016, 20:11

Gain wrote:Idk about America but the size of a mos burger meal is the same as a normal size meal in all European McDs. And HK McDs, Japanese McDs... It goes on.


OP didn't say where he's from. Portion sizes in the states are bigger than in Europe, no question about that. No question that Americans eat more than Taiwanese. If OP is from the states, he is going to have an adjustment coming over here in terms of food.
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Re: Living standards in Taiwan?

Postby Gain » 20 Jul 2016, 22:31

nonredneck wrote:OP didn't say where he's from. Portion sizes in the states are bigger than in Europe, no question about that. No question that Americans eat more than Taiwanese. If OP is from the states, he is going to have an adjustment coming over here in terms of food.

Fair enough. It's just that you seemed to be implying that food in Taiwan is of particularly small portion, while the reality is that the portion is standard/normal and the peculiar one here is America with your XXL burgers and fries.
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