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negotiating salary

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negotiating salary

Postby Andrew0409 » 26 Jul 2016, 14:59

So I've basically got a new job away and I'm hoping on advice on negotiating for higher salary. So basically, the job is coaching basketball on the weekend. I'm a extremely skilled player, with college experience and trained and was coached under NBA, NCAA coaches and trainers. Basically I know what I'm doing. And I'm bilingual fluently which the job is coached in English but requires some chinese to explain at times. So they want me to start at the basic starting salary which I find to be way to low. If I was just some guy that played basketball before I understand, but I don't feel that my pay is even close to reflective of what i bring to the table.

On the weekdays, I will be at a activity camp basically working on working on physically health where the Taiwanese school system ignores. I always feel like the pay is too low at the starting salary. I will basically provide physical activity for young children and teaching them about health and eating healthy and all that. Like I said, I've been a athlete all my life and played college basketball and baseball. And I'm fluent in Chinese and English which is what they want with 2 years of teaching experience. I just don't feel that the starting basic wage for everyone reflect what I bring to the table.

I would get a basic salary if I didn't really have all these experiences and skills, but that is not the case.

Any advice on negotiating for a higher salary?
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby the bear » 26 Jul 2016, 15:19

Andrew0409 wrote:So I've basically got a new job away and I'm hoping on advice on negotiating for higher salary. So basically, the job is coaching basketball on the weekend. I'm a extremely skilled player, with college experience and trained and was coached under NBA, NCAA coaches and trainers. Basically I know what I'm doing. And I'm bilingual fluently which the job is coached in English but requires some chinese to explain at times. So they want me to start at the basic starting salary which I find to be way to low. If I was just some guy that played basketball before I understand, but I don't feel that my pay is even close to reflective of what i bring to the table.

On the weekdays, I will be at a activity camp basically working on working on physically health where the Taiwanese school system ignores. I always feel like the pay is too low at the starting salary. I will basically provide physical activity for young children and teaching them about health and eating healthy and all that. Like I said, I've been a athlete all my life and played college basketball and baseball. And I'm fluent in Chinese and English which is what they want with 2 years of teaching experience. I just don't feel that the starting basic wage for everyone reflect what I bring to the table.

I would get a basic salary if I didn't really have all these experiences and skills, but that is not the case.

Any advice on negotiating for a higher salary?


To negotiate you need to actually bring something to the table to prove your value, like coaching certificates or testimonials, references from people who played under you. Its all very well to say "I'm a shit hot ball player" but in negotiations employers like to see quantifiable skills.
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby zender » 26 Jul 2016, 16:20

You should show them your college stats.

Bring in a chart showing your PPG, APG, RPG, STPG, BLKPG, GP, MPG, ORPM, DRPM, RPM, WINS, field goal percentage, free throw percentage, turnovers, 3-point field goals, minutes, fouls, double doubles,etc.

Offer to go one-on-one against the interviewer. Show off your trash-talking skills. Your salary will be determined by the score. :neutral:

No slap ass until the contract is signed.

Good luck.
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby Andrew0409 » 26 Jul 2016, 17:20

the bear wrote:
Andrew0409 wrote:So I've basically got a new job away and I'm hoping on advice on negotiating for higher salary. So basically, the job is coaching basketball on the weekend. I'm a extremely skilled player, with college experience and trained and was coached under NBA, NCAA coaches and trainers. Basically I know what I'm doing. And I'm bilingual fluently which the job is coached in English but requires some chinese to explain at times. So they want me to start at the basic starting salary which I find to be way to low. If I was just some guy that played basketball before I understand, but I don't feel that my pay is even close to reflective of what i bring to the table.

On the weekdays, I will be at a activity camp basically working on working on physically health where the Taiwanese school system ignores. I always feel like the pay is too low at the starting salary. I will basically provide physical activity for young children and teaching them about health and eating healthy and all that. Like I said, I've been a athlete all my life and played college basketball and baseball. And I'm fluent in Chinese and English which is what they want with 2 years of teaching experience. I just don't feel that the starting basic wage for everyone reflect what I bring to the table.

I would get a basic salary if I didn't really have all these experiences and skills, but that is not the case.

Any advice on negotiating for a higher salary?


To negotiate you need to actually bring something to the table to prove your value, like coaching certificates or testimonials, references from people who played under you. Its all very well to say "I'm a shit hot ball player" but in negotiations employers like to see quantifiable skills.


My resume is pretty amazing for my age. I worked with pro athletes in MMA events from all over the world. It's the owner that I need to convince, he never saw me coach. I already coached and the head coach knows that I know what I'm doing.
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby Gryphon » 26 Jul 2016, 19:13

Andrew0409 wrote:So I've basically got a new job away and I'm hoping on advice on negotiating for higher salary. So basically, the job is coaching basketball on the weekend. I'm a extremely skilled player, with college experience and trained and was coached under NBA, NCAA coaches and trainers. Basically I know what I'm doing. And I'm bilingual fluently which the job is coached in English but requires some chinese to explain at times. So they want me to start at the basic starting salary which I find to be way to low. If I was just some guy that played basketball before I understand, but I don't feel that my pay is even close to reflective of what i bring to the table.

On the weekdays, I will be at a activity camp basically working on working on physically health where the Taiwanese school system ignores. I always feel like the pay is too low at the starting salary. I will basically provide physical activity for young children and teaching them about health and eating healthy and all that. Like I said, I've been a athlete all my life and played college basketball and baseball. And I'm fluent in Chinese and English which is what they want with 2 years of teaching experience. I just don't feel that the starting basic wage for everyone reflect what I bring to the table.

I would get a basic salary if I didn't really have all these experiences and skills, but that is not the case.

Any advice on negotiating for a higher salary?


Anybody can say they have skills, were coached by so and so, had this experience and that. But they don't know if you're telling the truth. Many a con artist has fibbed their way into jobs. But I'm not saying you're a con artist. I'm just saying that's what con artists do.

Now, before you get all enraged and jump to conclusions about being judged. Know this: I am not judging you. What I believe you should do is provide ways to prove everything you stated. Ask your contacts first if you have their permission to use them as references. If they agree, then prepare their phone numbers and email in a list so the school can verify with their background checks. And if that's not enough, play the head coach 1-on-1 and show him your skills. But don't act cocky when you challenge the head coach to a 1-on-1 game. Be polite and tell him you can let him sample your skills in a 1-on-1 game.

AFTER you establish proof, then you can negotiate for higher pay. Otherwise, it's just your word that all you stated is true and the school has no other way to prove your statements.
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby Andrew0409 » 26 Jul 2016, 19:24

Gryphon wrote:
Andrew0409 wrote:So I've basically got a new job away and I'm hoping on advice on negotiating for higher salary. So basically, the job is coaching basketball on the weekend. I'm a extremely skilled player, with college experience and trained and was coached under NBA, NCAA coaches and trainers. Basically I know what I'm doing. And I'm bilingual fluently which the job is coached in English but requires some chinese to explain at times. So they want me to start at the basic starting salary which I find to be way to low. If I was just some guy that played basketball before I understand, but I don't feel that my pay is even close to reflective of what i bring to the table.

On the weekdays, I will be at a activity camp basically working on working on physically health where the Taiwanese school system ignores. I always feel like the pay is too low at the starting salary. I will basically provide physical activity for young children and teaching them about health and eating healthy and all that. Like I said, I've been a athlete all my life and played college basketball and baseball. And I'm fluent in Chinese and English which is what they want with 2 years of teaching experience. I just don't feel that the starting basic wage for everyone reflect what I bring to the table.

I would get a basic salary if I didn't really have all these experiences and skills, but that is not the case.

Any advice on negotiating for a higher salary?


Anybody can say they have skills, were coached by so and so, had this experience and that. But they don't know if you're telling the truth. Many a con artist has fibbed their way into jobs. But I'm not saying you're a con artist. I'm just saying that's what con artists do.

Now, before you get all enraged and jump to conclusions about being judged. Know this: I am not judging you. What I believe you should do is provide ways to prove everything you stated. Ask your contacts first if you have their permission to use them as references. If they agree, then prepare their phone numbers and email in a list so the school can verify with their background checks. And if that's not enough, play the head coach 1-on-1 and show him your skills. But don't act cocky when you challenge the head coach to a 1-on-1 game. Be polite and tell him you can let him sample your skills in a 1-on-1 game.

AFTER you establish proof, then you can negotiate for higher pay. Otherwise, it's just your word that all you stated is true and the school has no other way to prove your statements.


Ummm, being able to play has nothing to do with being able to coach. That sounds ridiculous playing for my salary. I'm not playing for a spot on the team, I'm coaching lol. The head coach sees I can coach. It's the program's owner that is handling the wage. The head coach has no control over my wage. I have contacts in my resume. My problem is that the owner is the one deciding on the salary and I'm going to chat with him and I'm looking for advice on how to negotiate for a higher salary. I'm obviously not going to say hey lets play one on one. SMH
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby Andrew0409 » 26 Jul 2016, 19:30

ok, just to clarify, I'm coaching kids not playing. So I don't get another stupid ass advice playing someone for my salary. And one and one skill is like the worst way to showcase your basketball knowledge. How do you know the head coach isn't 60? like are you guys serious? I can't play like I used to after a torn ACL and MLC and broken ankle. I rarely play basketball anymore, that does not mean I don't understand the game of basketball. I box and I play baseball. I have already coached with the head coach and he agrees that my salary is to low for my skill.

I'm asking for advice on to negotiate for a higher salary in general. Pretend it's not for coaching basketball if that helps.
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby headhonchoII » 26 Jul 2016, 19:35

You are assuming they will pay more for a better coach.
They might pay a little more and that's it, usually the way things go in Taiwan.
What Im saying is you could be the best coach in Taiwan and it might not make any real difference as they don't want to pay much.
Only way to make real coin is run your own course?l.
Why not have a look at doing that?

For practical advice nothing beats showing a) your qualifications and references and b) your coaching skills with the kids
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby Gryphon » 27 Jul 2016, 00:14

Showing skill in playing demonstrates knowledge of practical strategy. Duh... You can't be a good coach if you have no real experience in the game. That was the point of playing to demonstrate your knowledge. And you ignored the fact I said you didn't provide verifiable references. I could say I played with NBA players in street games because they're my neighbors. But that doesn't mean shit unless I can prove it.
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Re: negotiating salary

Postby yyy » 27 Jul 2016, 09:46

headhonchoII wrote:You are assuming they will pay more for a better coach.
They might pay a little more and that's it, usually the way things go in Taiwan.
What Im saying is you could be the best coach in Taiwan and it might not make any real difference as they don't want to pay much.
Only way to make real coin is run your own course?l.
Why not have a look at doing that?

Well said. Also what the OP said about health being underemphasized in the local system, I agree 100%, but how much does the owner understand/care about these things?

The only angles I can think of are (1) persuade the owner that the customers care enough to pay more for the higher perception of quality you can somehow produce; (2) accept a low salary for now, ask for a raise when you're up for renewal, and have the customers threaten to leave if you leave; or (3) accept a low salary for now and just poach the customers, assuming you don't need a work permit and aren't bound by a fully enforceable non-competition clause (and they're usually written to be broader than what can legally be enforced).
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